Gluten Free Oat Bread (without Tapioca)

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I have several different gluten free oat bread recipes, one for bread machines, one that is dairy free, and another that contains milk. However, because I am allergic to tapioca flour/starch, I created this oat bread recipe just for me, and others who are allergic to tapioca. Oat bread is my favorite gluten-free bread. It is flavorful, has a great texture, and is healthy for us. I hope you enjoy this recipe. Because it contains a little fava bean flour (which is not bitter), it rises high and makes it lighter. Enjoy!

Gluten Free Oat Bread (without Tapioca Flour)

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Yield: Makes 16 slices.

Gluten Free Oat Bread (without Tapioca Flour)

A gluten free oat bread recipe without the use of tapioca starch. You may use the cornstarch and potato starch or all of one. It's great for sandwiches.

Ingredients:

  • 1 1/8 cups non-fat milk (or dairy-free milk or water)
  • 2 Tablespoons honey (or agave nectar)
  • 2 1/4 teaspoons instant dry yeast
  • 1 1/4 cups gluten-free oat flour
  • 1 cup potato starch (or cornstarch)
  • 1/2 cup cornstarch (or potato starch)
  • 1/4 cup fava bean flour
  • 2 - 4 Tablespoons flax seed meal
  • 1 Tablespoon xanthan gum
  • 3/4 teaspoon fine sea salt
  • 4 large egg whites, at room temperature
  • 1/4 cup neutral flavored cooking oil
  • 1 teaspoon apple cider vinegar

Instructions:

  1. Mix the warm milk or water with honey or agave, add yeast, and stir to moisten the yeast. Allow to rest for while you prepare the flour or until it is foamy on the top.
  2. Whisk together the oat flours, potato starch, cornstarch, fava bean flour, flax seed meal, xanthan gum, and salt together in a large bowl, and it set aside.
  3. Beat the eggs at high speed in a large mixing bowl until bubbly, about 30 seconds.
  4. Add the oil, vinegar, and yeast mixture to the egg whites and beat on low speed (#2 on a KitchenAid mixer) just until combined.
  5. Add the dry ingredients all at once and mix just until combined. Increase the speed to high (# 10 on KitchenAid) and beat for 4 minutes (5 minutes for a double loaf).
  6. Oil a 9×5-inch loaf pan and scoop the dough into the pan. Sprinkle the top with water and smooth out the top using a rubber spatula. Distribute the dough evenly to meet all sides of the pan.
  7. Allow the dough to rise at room temperature (80°F) until it is about 1/2-inch over the top of the pan, about 30 minutes.
  8. Preheat the oven to 375°F 10 minutes prior to the end of the rising of the dough.
  9. Bake the bread in the center of the oven for about 37 minutes.
  10. Remove the loaf from the oven and immediately remove it from the pan and set the loaf on a cooling rack to cool completely, about 2 hours.
  11. Slice with an electric slicer, electric knife or serrated knife.

8 Replies to “Gluten Free Oat Bread (without Tapioca)”

    1. Ray,

      To make gluten free bread light, it takes potato, tapioca, or cornstarch. If you want to experiment, try using all buckwheat or oat flour and make tiny loaves. Add about 1/4 teaspoon baking powder to lighten it up. Baking soda may help as well. The bread will be more filling and heavier.

      Otherwise, I would forego bread and eat more vegetables and protein. Instead of sandwiches, I usually eat dinner types of food or a salad with leftover chicken or fajita meat.

      Good luck.

      Carla

  1. I would like to try this recipe but I am on a low FODMAP diet and cannot have the fava bean flour. Could I use white rice?

    1. Thelma,

      Legume flours such as soy and bean flours help baked good rise. If you desire to substitute with rice flour, try adding 1/4 teaspoon baking powder. The only thing you have to watch out for is it falling due to the higher rise/more holes. If the bread starts to sink in on the sides, bottom, or worse, the top, upon cooling, immediately add it back to the pan and bake in the oven for an additional 15 minutes. You have to watch it for the first 10 minutes of cooling or so.

      Carla

      1. Thanks, Carla.
        Do you have a suggestion other than a bean flour. I cannot have any beans, peas or legumes. My problem is not the gluten in breads but the fructans which are also in beans, peas, and legumes.

  2. What can I substitute for the flax seed meal. I am an older man and don’t eat flax due to the phytoestrogens it contains.

    Thanks, Pete

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