Fresh Fruit Heals Leaky Gut

The best recipes for a leaky gut contain whole foods (unprocessed foods), but some in particular. Perhaps you’re sick of fruit and are now going for those high carb snacks. I think we all have gone through the feeling of being deprived when we first start a gluten free diet, though once you find your favorite brands of gluten free baked goods, including bread, all hell breaks loose on the scale, at least those of us who have healed already. This is why I have been concentrating on finding a more healthy gluten free snack. Though I don’t ever think I’ll give up perfecting gluten free baked recipes. Everything in moderation, right? So, while your gut is still healing, ditch those high carb baked goods and reach recipes for leaky gut such as those containing high complex carbohydrates: legumes (if tolerated), fresh vegetables and fresh fruit.

Fresh Fruit for Leaky Gut

Though high glycemic fruits such as bananas, dried fruits, fruit juices, etc., should be avoided for those with a leaky gut, there are plenty of delicious fruit left to eat, and your body will love you for it. Fructose, (fruit sugar) is the healthiest sugar to heal your gut because it does not take any digestive enzymes to be absorbed by the gut. And because your body takes about 20 minutes for your liver to change the fructose into glucose your body is not suddenly hit with high blood sugar levels.One exception of eating fruit to heal a leaky would be those with candida. Anything high in sugar, including fruit will feed the yeast and make it grow. However, if this is not you, then begin adding apple sauce and other pureed fruit to your gluten free recipes instead of high amounts of sugar. Your body will thank you!

One exception of eating fruit to heal a leaky would be those with candida. Anything high in sugar, including fruit will feed the yeast and make it grow. However, if this is not you, then begin adding apple sauce and other pureed fruit to your gluten free recipes instead of high amounts of sugar. Your body will thank you!

High Fiber Fruit

For those of you interested in high fiber fruits that are allowed, you should eat: apples, avocado, berries, apricots, guava, kiwi, oranges, and pears.

Organic produce is the best way to go, as they are chemical- and additive-free. I recently learned that strawberries hold the most pesticides than other fruit, and it is almost impossible to wash off. It is best to look for a certified organic label when choosing organic produce. Then you can be certain it really is organic.

I learned decades ago that my family will never eat fruit on a regular basis unless it cut it up for them in bite size pieces, or just pre-sliced. I also found that making naturally gluten-free food attractive helps immensely. Using multiple colors is an easy trick I’ve learned, and using an attractive serving dish helps, as well.

Watermelon is one of my favorite fruit. It is not only cholesterol-free, fat-free and sodium-free, but makes a great natural diuretic.

While vacationing in Costa Rica I ate a lot of fruit and it was wonderful! It can make a great alternative to eating bread while waiting for your main entree. The above photo is from my trip to Costa Rica. The fruits whown are watermelon, pineapple, papaya and mango.

Speaking of mangos, one of the most popular articles on my old blog was how to cut a mango. If interested, see the instructions below, along with how to tell when it is sweet and how choose a ripe one.

How to Tell When a Mango is Ripe and Sweet

When shopping for mangos, color is not a consideration. It doesn’t matter if they are all red, all green or both red and green. A sweet smelling, uncut mango is usually sweet to the taste. My experience is that they all taste sweet if you wait for the mango to ripen.

Grocery stores seldom have ripe mangos, therefore, it may be difficult to tell when one is ripe. Much like an avocado, you want a mango to be soft and tender when you push on the mango itself, but not so soft as to dent it permanently. To speed up ripening store in a dark place or a brown paper bag.

How to Cut a Mango

You will notice that most mangos have one side that bulges out more than the other side.  That is the side that contains the most fruit. You will want to cut that side off with the peel still in tact. Take note that there is an oval-shaped pit that runs about an inch wide, off to the left of that bulge. In trying to find the pit, just pretend the bulge does not exist and that the bulge side is the same size as the other. The pit is in the middle. You will be cutting more from the bulge than you will from the other side. When you can peel the rest of the mango you will find a little fruit on the sides of the pit. I usually just eat this from the pit, as it does not usually cut off easily. The juices just pour from the sides. It is very sweet, too! It really takes practice to figure out where the pit is, but it doesn’t take long.

You will be able to peel the skin from the mango easily if the mango is ripe enough.  I use a paring knife. As stated above, mangos are a very fibrous fruit. If you don’t wish to eat all the fiber, which is heavier near the skin, you can skip the peeling and instead cut the mango in bite size pieces while still in attached to the skin and pull the fruit away from the skin with your hands. This leaves the heavy fiber behind, but you do not end up with nicely cut pieces. Another way to avoid the heavy fiber is to remove some of the outer fruit when peeling.

To your health!

Carla Spacher

You may be also interested in our other articles on Leaky Gut.

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